Consumer Information

Review: Cloud Defensive REIN Micro

REIN Micro and Box

After getting a chance to look at the Cloud Defensive OWL, I had the opportunity to test the REIN Micro weapon light. This is more in line with the standard weapon light setup as a two-part system with the mounted light and pressure switch connected by a cord. Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing basic about this light, and as I’ll highlight in my review, the REIN Micro absolutely shines as a defensive light.

Weapon Lights

Having a weapon light is incredibly important for personal protection, especially in home defense applications. Target identification is paramount, and a flashlight ensures you can properly evaluate your situation and environment. Additionally, you need to be able to clearly see your surroundings so you can safely maneuver around your residence. A weapon light, mounted to your firearm, frees up a hand so you can open doors and perform other tasks as you clear your home. A solid weapon light is good insurance in case things go bump in the night.

REIN Micro weapon light
The REIN Micro can be mounted to a firearm or used as a handheld light.

REIN Micro Features

The REIN Micro is another outstanding option from Cloud Defensive. With a smaller overall profile than its venerable full-size REIN weapon light, the Micro version delivers exceptional output. At 55,000 candela and 1,300 lumens, this light is no slouch. It runs off one 18350 battery and has a 40-minute runtime at max output, but will produce usable light for up to 3 hours. That’s plenty of time for home defense, but you’ll likely want some spare batteries if you’re running this light in a class. They can be easily sourced for under $10.

The REIN Micro produces cooler, whiter light when compared to the Optimized Weapon Light’s warmer yellow beam. This is similar to some of the more well-known lights from Streamlight and SureFire. I don’t believe that one is overtly better than the other, though I did prefer the yellow light from the OWL. The white light can sometimes wash out whatever it’s illuminating and produce glare, especially when shined on walls and ceilings that are painted white.

Aside from colors, there are two options when choosing a REIN Micro. I tested the base option with the push-button tail cap. However, for an extra $50 there’s an option that includes a remote pressure switch. If you prefer, the mount is removable and you can use the REIN as a handheld light as well. If you choose to run the light as a handheld, the S7 tool steel bezel ring — heat-treated to 53 Rockwell — makes your light a useful impact tool.

Daniel Defense MK18 with REIN Micro
Cloud Defensive makes a durable light that can withstand serious use.

Specifications

  • Lumens: 1,300
  • Candela: 55,000
  • Power: 18350 Battery
  • Usable light: 3 hours
  • Runtime at max output: 40 minutes
  • Waterproof: IPX-8, fully submersible to 100 feet for 24 hours
  • Operation: Push-button tail cap (remote pressure switch available)
  • Weight: 5.75 ounces (with battery)
  • Length: 4.91 inches

Mounting Options

Your mounting position will depend on personal preference and whether you chose the remote pressure switch model. The REIN Micro mounted easily and securely with the supplied mount. I’m left-handed and chose to mount the light on the right side near the front of my handguard, so I can easily press the tail cap with my support-hand thumb. Additionally, I would only use the light in the constant-on mode, so the pressure switch isn’t as necessary because I can quickly click the light on and forget about it. If you prefer the momentary-on function, you will probably want the remote switch upgrade. The cord for the pressure switch is short — keeping everything snag-free without having to use zip ties. This is a great benefit and something most competitors’ models lack. 

Weapon Light on AR pistol
The REIN Micro securley mounts to a Picatinny rail.

Operation

The REIN Micro features both momentary and constant-on modes. However, it does not incorporate a strobe function. That’s ok with me, strobe is not something I look for when purchasing, or would likely use, if it was included.

You have to partially break, or at least modify, your grip to hit the tail cap button, but it is doable. I’d stick with the constant-on mode if you are going to run the light in this way. The pressure switch makes momentary illumination a breeze, with a quick tap for constant on, and a longer hold and release for momentary illumination.

As mentioned previously, you can remove the mount and use it as a handheld light, if desired. This allows you to employ certain tactics, such as shining the light away from your body to possibly throw off any return fire or attack.

Cloud Defensive OWL and REIN Micro
The REIN Micro is smaller and lighter than the OWL, but produces similar light.

Conclusion: REIN Micro

With so many weapon lights on the market, it can be hard to not get lost in the options. Cloud Defensive makes some of the brightest and most durable lights on the market. It was no accident that it has earned a good reputation among serious shooters. The REIN Micro brings a new level of performance and dependability in a more compact package. It is among the best weapon lights I have used to date.

What’s your favorite weapon light? What do you think of the Cloud Defensive REIN Micro? Let us know in the comment section!

  • REIN Micro beam
  • REIN Micro Light
  • Light Mount
  • REIN Micro and Box
  • Light button
  • Cloud Defensive OWL and REIN Micro
  • AR Pistol and weapon light
  • AR pistol and weapon light

About the Author:

Alex Cole

Alex is a relatively young firearms enthusiast who’s been shooting consistently for around seven years. Though he is fairly new to the industry, he loves consuming all information related to guns and is constantly trying to enhance his knowledge, understanding and use of firearms. Not a day goes by where he doesn’t do something firearms-related.

Alex tries to visit the range at least a couple of times a month to maintain and improve his shooting skills. He also enjoys disassembling and reassembling firearms to see how they work and to keep them properly cleaned and maintained. He installs most of the upgrades to his firearms himself, taking it as a chance to learn.

Additionally, he is very into buying, selling and trading guns to test different firearms and learn more about them. He is not only interested in modern handguns and rifles, he appreciates the classics for both historical value and real-world use.
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